Bolognese Sauce with Kidney Beans, Mushrooms, and Pappardelle

Chef Bill Briwa from The Culinary Institute of America shows us how to make an old world comfort food classic with a contemporary twist. He prepares Pappardelle with Bolognese Sauce, but swaps out some of the meat for healthier kidney beans.

Print

Ingredients

  • 4 Tbsp. olive oil                                                                               
  • 1 1/2 lb. mushrooms, minced
  • 1 lb. ground veal
  • 1 lb. ground pork
  • 2 cups yellow onion, small dice
  • 2 cups carrots, diced
  • 2 cups celery, diced
  • 2 cups red wine, dry
  • 1/2 cup tomato paste
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 1 1/2 cups kidney beans, cooked
  • 2 oz. parmesan cheese, grated
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 rosemary sprigs, 3”
  • 3 bay leaf
  • 1 1/2 cups cream or crème fraiche
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • Ground black pepper, to taste
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 2 lb. pasta pappardelle
  • Parsley, chopped, for garnish
  • Parmesan cheese, grated, for garnish

Number of Servings : 16

Serving Size: 1 cup sauce + 1 cup pasta

Chef Bill Briwa from The Culinary Institute of America shows us how to make an old world comfort food classic with a contemporary twist. He prepares Pappardelle with Bolognese Sauce, but swaps out some of the meat for healthier kidney beans.

Directions

  1. In a large pot over high heat, add the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and sauté until golden and all the moisture has evaporated, about 10 minutes. Add the meat and continue to cook until browned as well. Add the onions, carrots, and celery and continue to sauté on medium heat until the vegetables are soft, about 5 to 6 more minutes. Add the garlic and cook for one more minute.
  2. Add the wine, stirring to release any of the drippings that are sticking to the bottom of the pan. Allow the mixture to cook for 5 more minutes, or until the wine is mostly evaporated.
  3. Add the tomato paste and stir well. Sauté until the tomato paste has turned a brickish red. Deglaze the pan with the beef stock, add the bay and rosemary, and simmer until reduced and all is tender. Add the beans and cream and continue to cook until it achieves a sauce-like thickness. Remove the rosemary and the bay leaf.
  4. Season with salt, pepper, nutmeg, and parmesan cheese and taste. Adjust the seasonings as needed.
  5. The sauce is ready to add to your cooked pasta, or will store in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.
  6. Bring a large pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Add the pasta and follow package directions until pasta is cooked.
  7. Drain the pasta in a colander and shake well to remove any extra water clinging to the pasta. Pour the pasta in a large serving bowl. Add the sauce and toss together until the pasta is evenly coated.

Notes: If available, take the rind of the parmesan cheese and add it to the sauce while it simmers. This will lend a tremendous savory flavor from an ingredient that otherwise would likely have thrown away in the garbage. If you do add the rind, omit the 2 ounces of cheese that the recipe calls for you with the sauce.

The addition of the beans to this dish stretches the two meats, making this dish more economical and healthier than if it was made with meat alone.

Recipe developed by The Culinary Institute of America as an industry service to the Northarvest Bean Growers Association.